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#034: Recovering Your Voice After an Illness


Recovering Your Voice After an Illness - Rebecca Reid Vocal Studio


The voice is an essential tool for singers, speakers, and voice professionals.

Whether you're performing on stage, giving a presentation, or just having a conversation, having a healthy and strong voice is important.

Unfortunately, illness can take a toll on the voice, leaving it hoarse, weak, or even completely silenced.

That's why it's so important to take steps to recover the voice after an illness.

In this blog post, we'll explore the impact of illness on the voice, the steps you can take to recover, and when to seek professional help.

By following these tips, you can help protect and preserve your voice, ensuring that you can continue to communicate effectively and with confidence.


 

Understanding the Impact of Illness on the Voice

Respiratory illnesses, such as colds, flu, and laryngitis, can have a significant impact on the voice.

These illnesses can cause inflammation, swelling, and irritation of the vocal cords, leading to hoarseness, weakness, or even complete loss of voice.

Understanding how the voice works and how it can be affected by illness is the first step in protecting and recovering your voice.

The voice is produced by the vibration of the vocal cords, two thin bands of muscle located in the larynx.

When you speak or sing, air from your lungs flows past the vocal cords, causing them to vibrate and produce sound.

However, when the vocal cords become inflamed or irritated, they can become stiff and less able to vibrate properly, leading to changes in the sound of the voice

This can result in hoarseness, weakness, or a complete loss of voice.

It's important to understand that the voice is not just a result of the vocal cords but also the entire respiratory and vocal system.

This means that even minor irritation or inflammation in the throat, nose, or other parts of the respiratory system can impact the voice.

That's why it's so important to take steps to recover the voice after an illness, especially if you rely on your voice for work or other activities.

By understanding the impact of illness on the voice, you can take the necessary steps to protect and recover your voice.

 

Rest and Hydration

Rest and hydration are two of the most important steps you can take to recover your voice after an illness.

Both rest and hydration play a crucial role in helping the body and the voice to heal and recover.

Rest is essential for both the body and the voice.

When you're sick, your body is working hard to fight off the illness and recover.

This can be exhausting, leaving you feeling tired and run down.

That's why it's so important to get plenty of rest, both physically and vocally.

Reduce speaking as much as possible and avoid singing, and take time to rest and recharge.

Hydration is also critical for voice recovery.

When you're sick, it's especially important to stay hydrated to help flush out any irritants and prevent further damage to the voice.

Drink plenty of water, and consider drinking warm liquids such as herbal tea or broth to help soothe the throat.

Avoid drinking drinks that can dehydrate you, such as coffee or alcohol, and steer clear of drinks that can irritate the throat, such as acidic juices.

By taking the time to rest and stay hydrated, you can help your body and your voice to recover more quickly and effectively.

And with proper care and attention, you can get back to speaking, singing, and communicating with confidence in no time.

 

Voice Exercises

Voice exercises can be an effective way to help recover your voice after an illness.

These exercises are designed to help strengthen and stretch the vocal cords, reducing inflammation and promoting healing.

Voice exercises can also help improve overall voice function and reduce the risk of future voice problems.

Here are some specific exercises that can be helpful for voice recovery:

  1. Gentle sighing: Gentle sighing can help to stretch and relax the vocal cords, reducing inflammation and promoting healing. To do a gentle sigh, simply inhale deeply and exhale slowly with a sighing sound. Repeat several times, taking care not to strain your voice.

  2. Scales and arpeggios: Doing simple scales and arpeggios in the middle voice on a vowels can help build the voice back up after illness.

Remember, these exercises should be performed gently and gradually, taking care not to strain or overuse the voice.

If you're not sure how to perform these exercises correctly, consider working with a voice therapist, speech-language pathologist or singing teacher to help guide you through the process.

By incorporating exercises into your voice recovery plan, you can help your voice to heal more quickly and effectively, reducing the risk of future voice problems.

 

Avoiding Voice Strain

One of the most important steps you can take to recover your voice after an illness is to avoid voice strain.


Voice strain occurs when you use your voice in a way that places too much tension or pressure on the vocal cords, causing them to become irritated or inflamed.


Here are some common triggers for voice strain, and tips for avoiding them:

  1. Speaking too loudly or for too long: Talking loudly or for long periods of time can place a lot of strain on the vocal cords, especially when the voice is recovering from an illness. To reduce the risk of voice strain, try to speak in a relaxed voice, and avoid extended periods of speaking or shouting.

  2. Singing incorrectly: Singing incorrectly, such as singing out of tune or without proper breathing techniques, can place a lot of strain on the voice. Consider working with a singing teacher to improve your singing technique and reduce the risk of voice strain.

  3. Clearing the throat frequently: Clearing the throat frequently can irritate the vocal cords, increasing the risk of voice strain. Instead of clearing your throat, try to cough gently or sip water to soothe the throat.

  4. Inhaling irritants: Inhaling irritants, such as cigarette smoke or air pollution, can irritate the vocal cords and increase the risk of voice strain. To reduce the risk of voice strain, avoid inhaling irritants and try to spend time in clean, fresh air.

By avoiding these voice strain triggers and taking steps to protect your voice, you can help your voice to recover more quickly and effectively, reducing the risk of future voice problems.

 

When to Seek Professional Help

While rest and hydration, along with voice exercises and avoiding voice strain, can help with voice recovery after an illness, there may be times when it's important to seek professional help.

If you experience any of the following symptoms, it's important to seek help from a professional:

  1. Persistent hoarseness: If your voice remains hoarse or raspy for more than two weeks, it may be a sign of a more serious problem. In this case, it's important to seek help from a professional.

  2. Difficulty breathing: If you experience difficulty breathing or feel like you can't catch your breath when speaking, this may be a sign of a more serious problem. In this case, seek help from a doctor or a specialist.

  3. Pain when speaking: If you experience pain or discomfort when speaking or singing, this may be a sign of a problem with your vocal cords or a more serious medical condition. In this case, seek help from a doctor or specialist.

There are several types of professionals who can help with voice recovery, including speech therapists, singing teachers, and ear, nose, and throat specialists.

A speech therapist can help you with voice therapy exercises and provide guidance on how to use your speaking voice correctly and avoid voice strain.

A singing teacher can help you develop a healthy singing technique and improve your overall vocal performance.

An ear, nose, and throat specialist can evaluate and treat any medical conditions that may be affecting your voice.

By seeking professional help when needed, you can help ensure that your voice is on the road to recovery and reduce the risk of future voice problems and injuries.

 

Taking care of your voice after an illness is an important step in ensuring that you're able to continue using it effectively.


The key to voice recovery is a combination of rest, hydration, voice exercises, and avoiding voice strain.

By prioritising voice recovery, you can help reduce the risk of future voice problems and ensure that your voice is in the best possible condition.

If you experience any persistent symptoms, such as hoarseness, difficulty breathing, or pain when speaking, it's important to seek professional help.

So, if you're recovering from an illness and want to ensure that your voice is in good shape, take the time to prioritise voice recovery.

By taking care of your voice, you can help ensure that it's there for you when you need it most.


Found this blog post helpful? Give it a like, share it with your friends, and leave a comment below to let me know how it benefited you!


* Disclaimer: The information provided in this blog post is for general informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for professional or medical advice. Singers and professional voice users should always consult with qualified professionals, such as singing teachers or medical practitioners before making any decisions or taking any actions related to their vocal health and wellbeing.


 

Further Reading

If you enjoyed reading this post, here are some other blog posts you might find interesting:


Say goodbye to hoarseness and hello to a healthy voice! Learn how to recover your voice after an illness with our step-by-step guide. Discover the importance of rest, hydration, voice therapy exercises, and avoiding voice strain. Get tips on when to seek professional help and ensure that your voice is in top shape. Start your voice recovery journey today!

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